Artículos

Sección 7.7 Respuestas

Sección 7.7 Respuestas



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

1. (y_ {1} = 2x ^ {3} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 4) ^ {n}} {n! (N + 2)!} X ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x + 4x ^ {2} -8 left (y_ {1} ln x-4 sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 4 ) ^ {n}} {n! (n + 2)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {j + 1} {j (j + 2)} right) x ^ {n} derecha) )

2. (y_ {1} = x sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n! (N + 1)!} X ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = 1-y_ {1} ln x + x sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n! (n + 1) !} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {2j + 1} {j (j + 1)} right) x ^ {n} )

3. (y_ {1} = x ^ {1/2}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1/2} + y_ {1} ln x + x ^ {1/2} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n} x ^ {n} )

4. (y_ {1} = x sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} X ^ {n} = xe ^ {- x} ; quad y_ {2} = 1-y_ {1} ln x + x sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} left ( sum {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {1} {j} right) x ^ {n} )

5. (y_ {1} = x ^ {1/2} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} left (- frac {3} {4} right) ^ {n} frac { prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} (2j + 1)} {n!} x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1/2} - frac {3} {4 } left (y_ {1} ln xx ^ {1/2} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} left (- frac {3} {4} right) ^ {n} frac { prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} (2j + 1)} {n!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {1} {j (2j + 1)} derecha) x ^ {n} derecha) )

6. (y_ {1} = x sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} X ^ {n} = xe ^ {- x} ; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} left (1+ frac {1} {2} x + frac {1} {2} x ^ {2} right) - frac {1} {2} left (y_ {1} ln xx sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} Left ( sum_ {j = 1 } ^ {n} frac {1} {j} derecha) x ^ {n} derecha) )

7. (y_ {1} = 6x ^ {3/2} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {4 ^ {n} n! (N +3)!} X ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 3/2} left (1+ frac {1} {8} x + frac {1} {64} x ^ {2} right) - frac {1} {768} left (y_ {1} ln x-6x ^ {3/2} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {4 ^ {n} n! (N + 3)!} Left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {2j + 3} {j (j + 3) } derecha) x ^ {n} derecha) )

8. (y_ {1} = frac {120} {x ^ {2}} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n! (N +5)!} X ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7} left (1+ frac {1} {4} x + frac {1} {24} x ^ {2 } + frac {1} {144} x ^ {3} + frac {1} {576} x ^ {4} right) - frac {1} {2880} left (y_ {1} ln x- frac {120} {x ^ {2}} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n! (n + f)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {2j + 5} {j (j + 5)} right) x ^ {n} right) )

9. (y_ {1} = frac {x ^ {1/2}} {6} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1) (n +2) (n + 3) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 5/2} left (1+ frac {1} {2} x + x ^ {2} derecha) -3y_ {1} ln x + frac {3} {2} x ^ {1/2} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1) (n + 2) (n + 3) left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {1} {j (j + 3)} right) x ^ {n} )

10. (y_ {1} = x ^ {4} left (1 - frac {2} {5} x right); quad y_ {2} = 1 + 10x + 50x ^ {2} + 200x ^ {3} - 300 left (y_ {1} ln x + frac {27} {25} x ^ {5} - frac {1} {30} x ^ {6} right) )

11. (y_ {1} = x ^ {3}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 3} left (1- frac {6} {5} x + frac {3} {4} x ^ {2} - frac {1} {3} x ^ {3} + frac {1} {8} x ^ {4} - frac {1} {20} x ^ {5} right) - frac {1} {120} left (y_ {1} ln x + x ^ {3} sum_ {n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n} 6! } {n (n + 6)!} x ^ {n} derecha) )

12. (y_ {1} = x ^ {2} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {1} {n!} Left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {2j + 3} {j + 4} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} left (1 + x + frac {1} {4} x ^ { 2} - frac {1} {12} x ^ {3} right) - frac {1} {16} y_ {1} ln x + frac {x ^ {2}} {8} sum_ { n = 1} ^ { infty} frac {1} {n!} left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {2j + 3} {j + 4} right) left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {(j ^ {2} + 3j + 6)} {j (j + 4) (2j + 3)} right) x ^ {n} )

13. (y_ {1} = x ^ {5} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1) (n + 2) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = 1- frac {x} {2} + frac {x ^ {2}} {6} )

14. (y_ {1} = frac {1} {x} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} Left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {(j + 3) (2j-3)} {j + 6} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7} left (1+ frac {26} {5} x + frac {143} {20} x ^ {2} right) )

15. (y_ {1} = x ^ {7/2} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {2 ^ {n} (n + 4 )!} x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1/2} left (1- frac {1} {2} x + frac {1} {8} x ^ {2 } - frac {1} {48} x ^ {3} right) )

16. (y_ {1} = x ^ {10/3} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1)} {9 ^ {n }} left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {3j + ​​7} {j + 4} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2 / 3} left (1+ frac {4} {27} x- frac {1} {243} x ^ {2} right) )

17. (y_ {1} = x ^ {3} sum_ {n = 0} ^ {7} (- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1) left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ { n} frac {j-8} {j + 6} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 3} left (1+ frac {52} {5} x + frac {234} {5} x ^ {2} + frac {572} {5} x ^ {3} + 143x ^ {4} right) )

18. (y_ {1} = x ^ {3} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {n}} {n!} Left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {n} frac {(j + 3) ^ {2}} {j + 5} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} left (1 + frac {1} {4} x right) )

19. (y_ {1} = x ^ {6} sum_ {n = 0} ^ {4} (- 1) ^ {n} 2 ^ {n} left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ { n} frac {j-5} {j + 5} right) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x (1 + 18x + 144x ^ {2} + 672x ^ {3} + 2016x ^ {4}) )

20. (y_ {1} = x ^ {6} left (1+ frac {2} {3} x + frac {1} {7} x ^ {2} right); quad y_ {2 } = x left (1+ frac {21} {4} x + frac {21} {2} x ^ {2} + frac {35} {4} x ^ {3} right) )

21. (y_ {1} = x ^ {7/2} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {n} (n + 1) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7/2} left (1- frac {5} {6} x + frac {2} {3} x ^ {2} - frac {1} {2} x ^ {3} + frac {1} {3} x ^ {4} - frac {1} {6} x ^ {5} right) )

22. (y_ {1} = frac {x ^ {10}} {6} sum_ {n = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {n} 2 ^ {n} (n + 1 ) (n + 2) (n + 3) x ^ {n}; quad y_ {2} = left (1- frac {4} {3} x + frac {5} {3} x ^ {2 } - frac {40} {21} x ^ {3} + frac {40} {21} x ^ {4} - frac {32} {21} x ^ {5} + frac {16} { 21} x ^ {6} derecha) )

23. (y_ {1} = x ^ {6} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (2j +5)} {2 ^ {m} m!} X ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {2} left (1+ frac {3} {2} x ^ {2} derecha) - frac {15} {2} y_ {1} ln x + frac {75} {2} x ^ {6} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (2j + 5)} {2 ^ {m + 1} m!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {1 } {j (2j + 5)} derecha) x ^ {2m} )

24. (y_ {1} = x ^ {6} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {2 ^ {m} m!} X ^ { 2m} = x ^ {6} e ^ {- x ^ {2}}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {2} left (1+ frac {1} {2} x ^ {2} derecha) - frac {1} {2} y_ {1} ln x + frac {x ^ {6}} {4} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {2 ^ {m} m!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {1} {j} right) x ^ {2m} )

25. (y_ {1} = 6x ^ {6} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! (M + 3 )!} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = 1 + frac {1} {8} x ^ {2} + frac {1} {64} x ^ {4} - frac {1 } {384} left (y_ {1} ln x-3x ^ {6} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1 (^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! (m + 3)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {2j + 3} {j (j + 3)} right) x ^ {2m} right) )

26. (y_ {1} = frac {x} {2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} (m + 2)} {m!} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1} -4y_ {1} ln x sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} (m + 2)} {m!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {j ^ {2} + 4j + 2} {j (j + 1) (j + 2)} right) x ^ {2m} )

27. (y_ {1} = 2x ^ {3} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! (M + 2 )!} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1} left (1+ frac {1} {4} x ^ {2} right) - frac {1} { 16} left (y_ {1} ln x-2x ^ {3} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! (m + 2)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {j + 1} {j (j + 2)} right) x ^ {2m} right) )

28. (y_ {1} = x ^ {- 1/2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m } (2j-1)} {8 ^ {m} m! (M + 1)!} X ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 5/2} + frac {1} { 4} y_ {1} ln xx ^ {- 1/2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (2j-1)} {8 ^ {m + 1} m! (M + 1)!} Left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {2j ^ {2} -2j-1} {j (j + 1) (2j-1)} derecha) x ^ {2m} )

29. (y_ {1} = x sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {2 ^ {m} m!} X ^ {2m} = xe ^ {- x ^ {2} / 2}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1} -y_ {1} ln x + frac {x} {2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {2 ^ {m} m!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {1} {j} right) x ^ {2m} )

30. (y_ {1} = x ^ {2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {1} {m!} X ^ {2m} = x ^ {2} e ^ {x ^ {2}}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} (1-x ^ {2}) - 2y_ {1} ln x + x ^ {2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {1} {m!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {1} {j} right) x ^ {2m} )

31. (y_ {1} = 6x ^ {5/2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {16 ^ {m} m! (M +3)!} X ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7/2} left (1+ frac {1} {32} x ^ {2} + frac {1} {1024} x ^ {4} right) - frac {1} {24576} left (y_ {1} ln x-3x ^ {5/2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {16 ^ {m} m! (m + 3)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {2j + 3} {j (j + 3)} derecha) x ^ {2m} derecha) )

32. (y_ {1} = 2x ^ {13/3} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac { prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (3j + 1)} {9 ^ {m} m! (m + 2)!} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {1/3} left (1+ frac {2} {9} x ^ {2 } right) + frac {2} {81} left (y_ {1} ln xx ^ {13/3} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac { prod_ {j = 1 } ^ {m} (3j + 1)} {9 ^ {m} m! (m + 2)!} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {3j ^ {2} + 2j +2} {j (j + 2) (3j + 1)} derecha) x ^ {2m} derecha) )

33. (y_ {1} = x ^ {2}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} (1 + 2x ^ {2}) - 2 left (y_ {1} ln x + x ^ {2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {1} {m (m + 2)!} x ^ {2m} right) )

34. (y_ {1} = x ^ {2} left (1- frac {1} {2} x ^ {2} right); quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 2} izquierda (1+ frac {9} {2} x ^ {2} derecha) - frac {27} {2} izquierda (y_ {1} ln x + frac {7} {12} x ^ { 4} -x ^ {2} sum_ {m = 2} ^ { infty} frac { left ( frac {3} {2} right) ^ {m}} {m (m-1) ( m + 2)!} x ^ {2m} derecha) )

35. (y_ {1} = sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {m} (m + 1) x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ { -4} )

36. (y_ {1} = x ^ {5/2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {(m + 1) (m + 2 ) (m + 3)} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7/2} (1 + x ^ {2}) ^ {2} )

37. (y_ {1} = frac {x ^ {7}} {5} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {m} (m + 5) x ^ {2m }; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 1} (1-2x ^ {2} + 3x ^ {4} -4x ^ {6}) )

38. (y_ {1} = x ^ {3} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {m} frac {m + 1} {2 ^ {m}} left ( prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {2j + 1} {j + 5} right) x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 7} left (1 + frac {21} {8} x ^ {2} + frac {35} {16} x ^ {4} + frac {35} {64} x ^ {6} right) )

39. (y_ {1} = 2x ^ {4} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} (- 1) ^ {m} frac { prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (4j +5)} {2 ^ {m} (m + 2)!} X ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = 1- frac {1} {2} x ^ {2} )

40. (y_ {1} = x ^ {3/2} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m} prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (2j-1)} {2 ^ {m-1} (m + 2)!} X ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- 5/2} left (1+ frac { 3} {2} x ^ {2} right) )

42. (y_ {1} = x ^ {v} sum_ {m = 0} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! Prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (j + v)} x ^ {2m}; quad y_ {2} = x ^ {- v} sum_ {m = 0} ^ {v-1} frac {(- 1) ^ {m}} {4 ^ {m} m! Prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (jv)} x ^ {2m} - frac {2} {4 ^ {v} v! ( v-1)!} left (y_ {1} ln x- frac {x ^ {v}} {2} sum_ {m = 1} ^ { infty} frac {(- 1) ^ { m}} {4 ^ {m} m! prod_ {j = 1} ^ {m} (j + v)} left ( sum_ {j = 1} ^ {m} frac {2j + v} { j (j + v)} derecha) x ^ {2m} derecha) )


Actividad 7.1b

Como trabajador de apoyo a la salud o trabajador social adulto, brindará atención a personas que tienen una variedad de necesidades, deseos y preferencias diferentes y en situaciones que pueden ser delicadas, personales o desafiantes. En la siguiente tabla, enumere las situaciones en las que la privacidad y la dignidad de una persona podrían verse comprometidas y luego, para cada una, describa cómo mantendría su privacidad y dignidad. Se le ha proporcionado un ejemplo.

Situaciones en las que la privacidad y la dignidad de una persona pueden verse comprometidasDescriba cómo mantendría la privacidad y la dignidad de la persona en esta situación.
1. Al ingresar al espacio, la cabecera, el cubículo, la habitación o la casa en la que se encuentra una personaEl código de conducta para los trabajadores de asistencia sanitaria y los trabajadores de asistencia social adultos establece que debo obtener el consentimiento antes de brindar atención y apoyo a una persona. Por lo tanto, siempre debo dar a conocer mi presencia y preguntarle a la persona si está feliz de que yo ingrese al espacio en el que se encuentra.
2. Al aplicar una crema para todo el cuerpo recetada a una personaMantener las partes íntimas cubiertas cuando no es necesario exponerlas. Asegurarse de que las puertas y cortinas estén cerradas. Solicitando consentimiento antes de comenzar. Mantener al individuo informado durante todo el proceso. Ser respetuoso.
3. Una persona que dice que quiere pasar tiempo a solas en su dormitorio.Respetar el deseo del individuo de tener tiempo a solas y no molestarlo.
4. La familia o los amigos de una persona hacen consultas sobre su salud.Respetar el derecho de la persona a la confidencialidad y obtener su consentimiento antes de compartir información personal.
5. Al ayudar a una persona a cocinar las comidasAnímelos a mantener la mayor independencia posible ayudando solo donde necesiten apoyo en lugar de hacer todo por ellos. Asegurarse de que tengan total autonomía al elegir las comidas y utilizar sus métodos culinarios preferidos.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver respuestas de tráfico de red

Nota de respuestas: El color de fuente rojo o las partes resaltadas en gris indican texto que aparece solo en la copia de Respuestas. Las actividades opcionales están diseñadas para mejorar la comprensión y / o proporcionar práctica adicional.

Topología

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 001

Objetivos

Parte 1: capturar y analizar datos ICMP locales en Wireshark

Parte 2: capturar y analizar datos ICMP remotos en Wireshark

Antecedentes / Escenario

Wireshark es un analizador de protocolos de software, o aplicación & # 8220packet sniffer & # 8221, que se utiliza para la resolución de problemas de red, análisis, desarrollo de software y protocolos, y educación. A medida que los flujos de datos viajan de un lado a otro a través de la red, el rastreador & # 8220 captura & # 8221 cada unidad de datos de protocolo (PDU) y puede decodificar y analizar su contenido de acuerdo con el RFC apropiado u otras especificaciones.

Wireshark es una herramienta útil para cualquier persona que trabaje con redes y se puede utilizar con la mayoría de los laboratorios de los cursos CCNA para el análisis de datos y la resolución de problemas. En esta práctica de laboratorio, utilizará Wireshark para capturar direcciones IP de paquetes de datos ICMP y direcciones MAC de tramas Ethernet.

Recursos necesarios

  • 1 PC (Windows 7, 8 o 10 con acceso a Internet)
  • Se utilizarán PC adicionales en una red de área local (LAN) para responder a las solicitudes de ping.

Nota de respuestas: Esta práctica de laboratorio asume que el estudiante está usando una computadora con acceso a Internet y puede hacer ping a otras computadoras en la red de área local.

El uso de un rastreador de paquetes como Wireshark puede considerarse una violación de la política de seguridad de la escuela. Se recomienda obtener permiso antes de ejecutar Wireshark para esta práctica de laboratorio. Si el uso de un rastreador de paquetes como Wireshark es un problema, es posible que las Respuestas deseen asignar el laboratorio como tarea o realizar una demostración paso a paso.

Parte 1: capturar y analizar datos ICMP locales en Wireshark

En la Parte 1 de esta práctica de laboratorio, hará ping a otra PC en la LAN y capturará las solicitudes y respuestas ICMP en Wireshark. También buscará información específica dentro de los marcos capturados. Este análisis debería ayudar a aclarar cómo se utilizan los encabezados de los paquetes para transportar datos a su destino.

Paso 1: recupere las direcciones de la interfaz de su PC.

Para esta práctica de laboratorio, deberá recuperar la dirección IP de su PC y la dirección física de la tarjeta de interfaz de red (NIC), también denominada dirección MAC.

  1. Abra una ventana de comando, escriba ipconfig / ally luego presione Entrar.
  2. Anote la dirección IP de la interfaz de su PC, su descripción y su dirección MAC (física).

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 002

Paso 2: Inicie Wireshark y comience a capturar datos.

  1. En su PC, haga clic en Windows Comienzo para ver Wireshark en la lista como uno de los programas en el menú emergente. Haga doble clic Wireshark.
  2. Después de que se inicie Wireshark, haga clic en la interfaz de captura que se utilizará. Debido a que estamos usando la conexión Ethernet por cable en la PC, asegúrese de que la opción Ethernet esté en la parte superior de la lista.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas de tráfico de red 003

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 004

Nota: Podemos administrar aún más las interfaces en la PC haciendo clic en Administrar interfaces. Verifique que la descripción coincida con lo que anotó en el Paso 1b. Cierra el Administrar interfaces ventana después de verificar la interfaz correcta.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 005

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 006

Nota: También puede iniciar la captura de datos haciendo clic en el Wireshark icono en la interfaz principal.La información comenzará a desplazarse hacia abajo en la sección superior en Wireshark. Las líneas de datos aparecerán en diferentes colores según el protocolo.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 007

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: Uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 008

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas del tráfico de red 009

Observe que comienza a ver que los datos aparecen nuevamente en la ventana superior de Wireshark.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas de tráfico de red 010

Paso 3: Examine los datos capturados.

En el Paso 3, examine los datos que fueron generados por las solicitudes de ping de la PC de su equipo. Los datos de Wireshark se muestran en tres secciones: 1) La sección superior muestra la lista de tramas de PDU capturadas con un resumen de la información del paquete IP enumerada 2) la sección central enumera la información de PDU para la trama seleccionada en la parte superior de la pantalla y separa una trama de PDU capturada por sus capas de protocolo y 3) la sección inferior muestra los datos sin procesar de cada capa. Los datos brutos se muestran tanto en formato hexadecimal como decimal.

3.4.1.2 Práctica de laboratorio: uso de Wireshark para ver las respuestas de tráfico de red 011

  1. Haga clic en las primeras tramas de PDU de solicitud de ICMP en la sección superior de Wireshark. Note que el Fuente columna tiene la dirección IP de su PC, y la Destino La columna contiene la dirección IP de la computadora del compañero de equipo al que hizo ping.
  2. Con este marco de PDU aún seleccionado en la sección superior, navegue hasta la sección central. Haga clic en el signo más a la izquierda de la fila Ethernet II para ver las direcciones MAC de origen y destino.

¿La dirección MAC de origen coincide con la interfaz de su PC (que se muestra en el Paso 1.b)? ______ Sí

¿La dirección MAC de destino en Wireshark coincide con la dirección MAC del miembro de su equipo?

¿Cómo obtiene su PC la dirección MAC de la PC a la que se le hizo ping?

La dirección MAC se obtiene mediante una solicitud ARP.

Nota: En el ejemplo anterior de una solicitud ICMP capturada, los datos ICMP se encapsulan dentro de una PDU de paquete IPv4 (encabezado IPv4) que luego se encapsula en una PDU de marco Ethernet II (encabezado Ethernet II) para su transmisión en la LAN.

Parte 2: capturar y analizar datos ICMP remotos en Wireshark

En la Parte 2, hará ping a los hosts remotos (hosts que no están en la LAN) y examinará los datos generados a partir de esos pings. Luego, determinará en qué se diferencian estos datos de los datos examinados en la Parte 1.

Paso 1: comience a capturar datos en la interfaz.

  1. Vuelva a iniciar la captura de datos.
  2. Una ventana le solicita que guarde los datos capturados previamente antes de iniciar otra captura. No es necesario guardar estos datos. Hacer clic Continuar sin guardar.
  3. Con la captura activa, haga ping a las siguientes tres URL del sitio web:
    1. www.yahoo.com
    2. www.cisco.com Nota: Cuando haga ping a las URL enumeradas, observe que el servidor de nombres de dominio (DNS) traduce la URL a una dirección IP. Anote la dirección IP recibida para cada URL.

    Paso 2: examinar y analizar los datos de los hosts remotos.

    1. Revise los datos capturados en Wireshark y examine las direcciones IP y MAC de las tres ubicaciones a las que hizo ping. Enumere las direcciones IP y MAC de destino para las tres ubicaciones en el espacio provisto.
      1 er Ubicación: IP: _____._____._____._____ MAC: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____
      2da ubicación: IP: _____._____._____._____ MAC: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____
      Tercera ubicación: IP: _____._____._____._____ MAC: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____: ____
      Direcciones IP: 98.139.180.180, 23.13.155.188, 216.58.194.100 (estas direcciones IP pueden variar)
      Dirección MAC: será la misma para las tres ubicaciones. Es la dirección física de la interfaz LAN de la puerta de enlace predeterminada del enrutador.
    2. ¿Qué tiene de importante esta información?
      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Las direcciones MAC de las tres ubicaciones son las mismas.
    3. ¿En qué se diferencia esta información de la información de ping local que recibió en la Parte 1?
      ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
      Un ping a un host local devuelve la dirección MAC de la NIC de la PC. Un ping a un host remoto devuelve la dirección MAC de la interfaz LAN de la puerta de enlace predeterminada.

    Reflexión

    ¿Por qué Wireshark muestra la dirección MAC real de los hosts locales, pero no la dirección MAC real de los hosts remotos?

    Las direcciones MAC de los hosts remotos no se conocen en la red local, por lo que se utiliza la dirección MAC de la puerta de enlace predeterminada. Una vez que el paquete llega al enrutador de puerta de enlace predeterminada, la información de la capa 2 se elimina del paquete y se adjunta un nuevo encabezado de capa 2 con la dirección MAC de destino del enrutador del siguiente salto.

    Apéndice A: Permitir el tráfico ICMP a través de un firewall

    Si los miembros de su equipo no pueden hacer ping a su PC, es posible que el firewall esté bloqueando esas solicitudes. Este apéndice describe cómo crear una regla en el firewall para permitir solicitudes de ping. También describe cómo deshabilitar la nueva regla ICMP después de haber completado la práctica de laboratorio.

    Paso 1: cree una nueva regla de entrada que permita el tráfico ICMP a través del firewall.

    1. Desde el Panel de control, haga clic en el Sistema y seguridad opción.
    2. Desde el Sistema y seguridad ventana, haga clic en firewall de Windows.
    3. En el panel izquierdo del firewall de Windows ventana, haga clic en Ajustes avanzados.
    4. Sobre el seguridad avanzada ventana, elija la Reglas de entrada en la barra lateral izquierda y luego haga clic en Nueva regla… en la barra lateral derecha.
    5. Esto lanza el Nueva regla de entrada mago. Sobre el Tipo de regla pantalla, haga clic en el Personalizado botón de radio y haga clic en Próximo
    6. En el panel izquierdo, haga clic en el Protocolo y puertos opción y usando la Tipo de protocolo menú desplegable, seleccione ICMPv4y luego haga clic en Próximo.
    7. En el panel izquierdo, haga clic en el Nombre opción y en la Nombre Tipo de campo Permitir solicitudes ICMP. Hacer clic Terminar.Esta nueva regla debería permitir que los miembros de su equipo reciban respuestas de ping desde su PC.

    Paso 2: deshabilitar o eliminar la nueva regla ICMP.

    Una vez finalizada la práctica de laboratorio, es posible que desee deshabilitar o incluso eliminar la nueva regla que creó en el Paso 1. Desactivar regla Esta opción le permite volver a habilitar la regla en una fecha posterior. La eliminación de la regla la elimina de forma permanente de la lista de reglas de entrada.

    1. Sobre el seguridad avanzada ventana, haga clic en Reglas de entrada en el panel izquierdo y luego ubique la regla que creó en el Paso 1.
    2. Para deshabilitar la regla, haga clic en el Desactivar regla opción. Cuando elija esta opción, verá que esta opción cambia a Habilitar regla. Puede alternar entre Desactivar regla y Habilitar regla el estado de la regla también se muestra en el Activado columna de la Reglas de entrada lista.
    3. Para eliminar permanentemente la regla ICMP, haga clic en Borrar. Si elige esta opción, debe volver a crear la regla para permitir respuestas ICMP.

    Unidad 7 Sección 2: Encontrar el siguiente término

    En esta sección, utilizaremos los primeros números de una secuencia para deducir el patrón y, por tanto, encontrar el siguiente término.

    Pregunta de ejemplo

    Para ayudarnos a identificar el patrón, generalmente es útil resolver las diferencias entre cada término, así:

    Podemos ver que cada término se encuentra sumando 5 al término anterior, por lo que el 4to término debe ser 27 (22 + 5 = 27)

    ¿Cuáles son el quinto y sexto trimestre?

    (b) ¿Cuáles son los siguientes 3 números en la secuencia: 50, 47, 44, 41, 38,. ?

    Nuevamente, encontramos las diferencias:

    Esta vez, cada término se encuentra restando 3 del término anterior, por lo que el sexto término debe ser 35 (38 - 3 = 35)

    ¿Cuáles son los términos séptimo y octavo?

    Ejercicios

    IMPORTANTE: Cuando una pregunta solicita una lista de números, debe separarlos por comas, así:

    Pregunta 1
    Observa las diferencias en cada una de estas secuencias y calcula los siguientes tres números.
    Recuerde poner comas entre los números en sus respuestas.

    Pregunta 2
    Complete el número que falta en cada una de las siguientes secuencias.

    Pregunta 3
    Observa las diferencias en cada una de estas secuencias y calcula los siguientes tres números.
    Recuerde poner comas entre los números en sus respuestas.

    Pregunta 4
    En cada una de las partes de esta pregunta hay una secuencia de patrones. Dibuja los siguientes dos patrones en la secuencia en la cuadrícula provista y da los siguientes tres números en cada secuencia. Para trazar puntos, simplemente haga clic en la cuadrícula proporcionada y aparecerá una marca. Haga clic nuevamente en el mismo punto si desea eliminar una marca en particular.

    Pregunta 5
    Encuentra el primer número en cada una de estas secuencias.

    Pregunta 6
    Calcula los siguientes tres números en cada secuencia a continuación.
    Tenga cuidado, es posible que las diferencias entre cada término no sean constantes.

    Pregunta 7
    Complete el número que falta en cada una de las siguientes secuencias.


    Notas y comentarios

    D & ampC 77: 1. La tierra como un mar de cristal

    El siguiente incidente de la historia del profeta José Smith amplía este versículo: “Durante la cena, les comenté a mi familia y amigos presentes que cuando la tierra fuera santificada y se volviera como un mar de vidrio, sería un gran urim y tumim, y los santos podrían mirar en él y ver como se les ve ”(Historia de la Iglesia, 5:279).

    El presidente Brigham Young dio la siguiente idea: “Esta Tierra se convertirá en un cuerpo celeste, será como un mar de vidrio, o como un Urim y Tumim y cuando quieras saber algo, puedes mirar en esta Tierra y ver todas las eternidades de Dios ”(en Revista de discursos, 8: 200 (véase también D. y C. 88: 17–20, 25–26 130: 6–9).

    D & ampC 77: 2–3. ¿Representan las “cuatro bestias” mencionadas en Apocalipsis 4: 6 lo mismo que otras bestias mencionadas por Juan?

    Juan vio cuatro bestias individuales en la presencia de Dios dándole “gloria y honra y gracias” (Apocalipsis 4: 9). Aunque eran bestias reales que se salvaron en su esfera, en sentido figurado representan clases de seres (hombre, bestias, reptiles, aves) que tendrían felicidad en la eternidad: “disfrute de la felicidad eterna” (D. y C. 77: 3).

    En un discurso durante una conferencia de la Iglesia en Nauvoo el sábado 8 de abril de 1843, José Smith explicó la descripción de Juan de las bestias que vio en el cielo y comparó las referencias de Juan a las bestias con las hechas por los profetas antiguos. La explicación resultó de que el élder Pelatiah Brown interpretó erróneamente Apocalipsis 5: 8 diciendo que las cuatro bestias representaban diferentes fases del reino de Dios en la tierra. El profeta José Smith enseñó que el Señor no usaría “la figura de una criatura de la creación bruta para representar aquello que es mucho más noble, glorioso e importante: las glorias y majestad de Su reino”. Dios no tomaría "una figura menor para representar una mayor". (Enseñanzas, págs. 288–89.)

    Parte de la confusión es que dos usos diferentes de la palabra bestia se encuentran en Apocalipsis, y José comentó sobre ambos en este sermón. En los lugares donde Juan se refiere a criaturas reales que están en el cielo, la palabra griega es Zoon (pronunciado zoh-ohn), que se traduce como “un ser viviente” (ver Apocalipsis 4: 6–9 5: 6–14 6: 1–7 7:11 14: 3 15: 7 19: 4). Donde John usa bestia como símbolo de los reinos degenerados del mundo o el reino de Satanás, la palabra griega therion, traducido como “una bestia salvaje”, se usa (ver Apocalipsis 6: 8 11: 7 13: 1–18 14: 9, 11 15: 2 16: 2, 10, 13 17: 1–18 19: 19–20 20 : 4, 10). Por lo tanto, Zoon se refiere a criaturas reales vistas en el cielo Therion se utiliza como concepto simbólico. El profeta José explicó el significado de ambos:

    “Cuando Dios usó la figura de una bestia en visiones a los profetas, lo hizo para representar aquellos reinos que se habían degenerado y se habían vuelto corruptos, salvajes y semejantes a bestias en su carácter, incluso los reinos degenerados del mundo inicuo, pero nunca hizo uso de la figura de una bestia ni de ninguna de las bestias para representar Su reino. ...

    “Hay una gran diferencia y distinción entre las visiones y figuras de las que hablaban los antiguos profetas y las de las que se habla en las revelaciones de Juan. ...

    “… Hay una gran distinción entre el significado real de los profetas y la traducción actual. Los profetas no declaran que vieron una bestia o bestias, sino que vieron la imagen o figura de una bestia. Daniel no vio un oso o un león real, sino las imágenes o figuras de esas bestias. La traducción debería haberse traducido como "imagen" en lugar de "bestia", en todos los casos en que los profetas mencionan a las bestias. Pero Juan vio a la bestia real en el cielo, mostrándole que las bestias realmente existían allí, y no para representar figuras de cosas en la tierra. ...

    “Juan vio bestias de aspecto curioso en el cielo, vio a toda criatura que había en el cielo, todas las bestias, aves y peces en el cielo, en realidad allí, dando gloria a Dios. ¿Cómo lo demuestras? (Ver Apocalipsis 5:13.) ...

    “Supongo que Juan vio seres allí de mil formas, que habían sido salvados de diez mil veces diez mil tierras como esta, bestias extrañas de las que no tenemos concepción: todas pueden verse en el cielo. El gran secreto era mostrarle a Juan lo que había en el cielo. Juan aprendió que Dios se glorificó a sí mismo al salvar todo lo que sus manos habían hecho, ya sean bestias, aves, peces u hombres, y se glorificará a sí mismo con ellos ". (Enseñanzas, págs.289–91.)

    D & ampC 77: 2. ¿Son los santos responsables de comprender el uso que hace el Señor de imágenes simbólicas de bestias u otras figuras?

    El profeta José Smith dijo: “Hago esta amplia declaración, que cada vez que Dios da una visión de una imagen, bestia o figura de cualquier tipo, Él siempre se considera responsable de dar una revelación o interpretación del significado de la misma, de lo contrario, no somos responsables de nuestra creencia en él. No tenga miedo de ser condenado por no conocer el significado de una visión o figura, si Dios no ha dado una revelación o interpretación del tema ". (Enseñanzas, pag. 291.)

    D & ampC 77: 5. ¿Por qué se le mostró a Juan veinticuatro ancianos en el paraíso de Dios?

    El día de Juan fue uno de gran persecución y martirio para los santos (véase Apocalipsis 6: 9-11). Los líderes de la Iglesia a quienes Juan estaba escribiendo estaban pasando por inmensas dificultades. En sus terribles circunstancias, recibieron la seguridad de que al soportar fielmente las pruebas que se les imponían, serían exaltados en la presencia de Dios, “vestidos de ropas blancas” con “coronas” en la cabeza (Apocalipsis 4: 4). Cuán reconfortante sería para ellos, y qué gran fuente de fortaleza para ellos, recibir este mensaje de Juan.

    D & ampC 77: 6–7. ¿Por qué fue sellado el libro que vio Juan?

    “'El libro que Juan vio' representa la historia real del mundo: lo que ha visto el ojo de Dios, lo que ha escrito el ángel registrador y los siete mil años, correspondientes a los siete sellos del volumen Apocalíptico, son como siete grandes días durante los cuales la Madre Tierra cumplirá su misión mortal, trabajando seis días y descansando el séptimo, su período de santificación. Estos siete días no incluyen el período de creación y preparación de nuestro planeta como lugar de residencia del hombre. Están limitados a la 'existencia temporal' de la Tierra, es decir, al Tiempo, considerado distinto de la Eternidad ". (Whitney, Pensamientos del sábado por la noche, pag. 11.)

    Un sello, como Juan usó el término (véase Apocalipsis 5: 1–2), era un poco de cera que aseguraba una carta o documento doblado y tenía la impresión de un sello. Una vez sellado, el documento no se puede abrir sin que se rompa el sello. En el caso de la historia y el destino de la tierra, solo hay uno que es digno de abrir el sello y revelar el contenido: Jesucristo (ver Apocalipsis 5: 2-9). Solo mediante la expiación de Cristo tiene algún valor la existencia temporal de la tierra. Él es el único que tiene la clave para el cumplimiento del propósito para el que fue creada la tierra. Gracias a Él, el plan de salvación tendrá éxito. Sin Él, todos fracasarían y quedarían en nada, o permanecerían sellados.

    D & ampC 77: 8. Cuatro ángeles enviados por Dios con poder para salvar la vida y destruirla

    El presidente Joseph Fielding Smith explicó que “estos ángeles parecen encajar en la descripción de los ángeles de los que se habla en la parábola del trigo y la cizaña (Mat. 13: 24–43 y D. y C. 86:17), que suplican con el Señor para que salieran a segar el campo. Se les dijo que dejaran que el trigo y la cizaña crecieran juntos hasta el fin de la cosecha, que es el fin del mundo (Mat. 13: 38–39). ...

    “A estos ángeles se les ha dado poder sobre las cuatro partes [cuartos] de la tierra y tienen el poder de encomendar el Evangelio eterno a los pueblos de la tierra. La plenitud del Evangelio no fue restaurada por ningún mensajero enviado desde la presencia del Señor. Todos los profetas antiguos que tenían llaves y vinieron y las restauraron, participaron en esta gran obra de restauración. Hay, aprendemos de esta revelación, cuatro ángeles a quienes se les ha dado el poder de cerrar los cielos, abrirlos y con poder para vida y también para muerte y destrucción. Estos ahora están trabajando en la tierra en su sagrada misión ". (Historia de la Iglesia y Revelación moderna, 1:300–301.)

    Susa Young Gates informó sobre un discurso del presidente Wilford Woodruff en el que declaró: “Esos ángeles han abandonado los portales del cielo y ahora están sobre este pueblo y esta nación, y están flotando sobre la tierra esperando derramar los juicios. Y desde este mismo día serán derramados ”. (Diario de las mujeres jóvenes, Agosto de 1894, pág. 512 véanse también Notas y comentarios de D & ampC 86: 5.)

    D & ampC 77: 9. ¿Cuál es el significado del ángel del este que sella a los siervos de Dios?

    A los cuatro ángeles a quienes se les ha dado poder sobre la tierra se les impide enviar desolaciones sobre la tierra hasta que los siervos de Dios sean sellados en sus frentes. The Prophet Joseph Smith taught that this sealing “signifies sealing the blessing upon their heads, meaning the everlasting covenant, thereby making their calling and election sure” (Teachings, pag. 321).

    Elder Orson Pratt gave this additional explanation:

    “When the Temple is built [in the New Jerusalem] the sons of the two Priesthoods [Melchizedek and Aaronic] … will enter into that Temple … and all of them who are pure in heart will behold the face of the Lord and that too before he comes in his glory in the clouds of heaven, for he will suddenly come to his Temple, and he will purify the sons of Moses and of Aaron, until they shall be prepared to offer in that Temple an offering that shall be acceptable in the sight of the Lord. In doing this, he will purify not only the minds of the Priesthood in that Temple, but he will purify their bodies until they shall be quickened, and renewed and strengthened, and they will be partially changed, not to immortality, but changed in part that they can be filled with the power of God, and they can stand in the presence of Jesus, and behold his face in the midst of that Temple.

    “This will prepare them for further ministrations among the nations of the earth, it will prepare them to go forth in the days of tribulation and vengeance upon the nations of the wicked, when God will smite them with pestilence, plague and earthquake, such as former generations never knew. Then the servants of God will need to be armed with the power of God, they will need to have that sealing blessing pronounced upon their foreheads that they can stand forth in the midst of these desolations and plagues and not be overcome by them. When John the Revelator describes this scene he says he saw four angels sent forth, ready to hold the four winds that should blow from the four quarters of heaven. Another angel ascended from the east and cried to the four angels, and said, ‘Smite not the earth now, but wait a little while.’ ‘How long?’ ‘Until the servants of our God are sealed in their foreheads.’ What for? To prepare them to stand forth in the midst of these desolations and plagues, and not be overcome. When they are prepared, when they have received a renewal of their bodies in the Lord’s temple, and have been filled with the Holy Ghost and purified as gold and silver in a furnace of fire, then they will be prepared to stand before the nations of the earth and preach glad tidings of salvation in the midst of judgments that are to come like a whirlwind upon the wicked.” (In Journal of Discourses, 15:365–66.)

    D&C 77:11. Who Are the 144,000?

    “Before the Lord shall come … there is to be a great work among the nations. … The ten tribes will have to come forth and come to this land, to be crowned with glory in the midst of Zion by the hands of the servants of God, even the Children of Ephraim and twelve thousand High Priests will be elected from each of these ten tribes, as well as from the scattered tribes, and sealed in their foreheads, and will be ordained and receive power to gather out of all nations, kindreds, tongues and people as many as will come unto the general assemblage of the Church of the first-born.” (Orson Pratt, in Journal of Discourses, 16:325.)

    D&C 77:12. What Things Has Christ “Not Put into His Power”?

    D&C 77:12. What Is the Purpose for the Sounding of Trumpets by Seven Angels?

    Trumpets were used anciently to herald or announce something or to draw attention to something. The seven angels who sound trumpets in Revelation 8–10 will signal events that will take place in the beginning of the seventh thousand years (after the seventh seal is opened see Revelation 8:1), before the Lord comes in His glory.

    D&C 77:14. What Is the Symbolism of the Little Book Eaten by John?

    Elder Bruce R. McConkie said that “John’s act of eating a book containing the word of God to him was in keeping with the custom and tradition of ancient Israel. The act signified that he was eating the bread of life, that he was partaking of the good word of God, that he was feasting upon the word of Christ—which was in his mouth sweet as honey. But it made his belly bitter that is, the judgments and plagues promised those to whom the Lord’s word was sent caused him to despair and have sorrow of soul. ‘How sweet are thy words unto my taste! yea, sweeter than honey to my mouth!’ (Psalm 119:103.) Such is the exulting cry of the Psalmist. And conversely, how bitter is the penalty for rebellion and disobedience. Ezekiel had a similar experience. He was commanded to eat a roll (a book), which was in his mouth as honey for sweetness, but in the writing itself there was ‘lamentations, and mourning, and woe.’ (Ezek. 2:6–10 3:1–3.)” (Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 3:507.)

    D&C 77:14. Are John the Revelator and the Angel Ascending from the East the Same Person?

    Verse 9 indicates that the angel from the east is Elias in verse 14 it is seen that John the Revelator is Elias and in other scriptural passages Elias is referred to in connection with the restoration of all things. In the following passages several individuals are identified by the name Elias: Joseph Smith Translation, Matthew 17:11–14 Joseph Smith Translation, John 1:21–28 Doctrine and Covenants 77:9, 14 (see also D&C 27:6–7 Luke 1:5–25 Smith, Teachings, pag. 157).

    Elder Bruce R. McConkie explained that several individuals have been called Elias: “By finding answer to the question, by whom had the restoration been effected, we shall find who Elias is and find there is no problem in harmonizing these apparently contradictory revelations. Who has restored all things? Was it one man? Certainly not. Many angelic ministrants have been sent from the courts of glory to confer keys and powers, to commit their dispensations and glories again to men of earth. At least the following have come: Moroni, John the Baptist, Peter, James and John, Moses, Elijah, Elias, Gabriel, Raphael, and Michael. (D&C 13 110 128:19–21.) Since it is apparent that no one messenger has carried the whole burden of the restoration, but rather that each has come with a specific endowment from on high, it becomes clear that Elias is a composite personage. The expression must be understood to be a name and a title for those whose mission it was to commit keys and powers to men in this final dispensation.” (Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 3:492.)

    In his mission to help gather the tribes of Israel, John the Revelator functioned under the title “Elias.” He came with Peter and James as one of the angels of the Restoration, so he must be included as part of the composite personage symbolized by the “angel ascending from the east” (D&C 77:9).

    D&C 77:15. Who Are the Two Witnesses Referred to by John?

    Elder Parley P. Pratt wrote: “John, in the eleventh chapter of Revelation, gives us many more particulars concerning [the great war in Israel after the Jews are gathered there]. He informs us that after the city and temple are rebuilt by the Jews, the Gentiles will tread it under foot forty and two months, during which time there will be two prophets continually prophesying and working mighty miracles. And it seems that the Gentile army shall be hindered from utterly destroying and overthrowing the city, while these two prophets continue. But, after a struggle of three years and a half, they will at length succeed in destroying these two prophets and then overrunning much of the city they will send gifts to each other because of the death of the two prophets, and in the meantime will not allow their dead bodies to be put in graves, but suffer them to lie in the streets of Jerusalem three days and a half, during which time the armies of the Gentiles, consisting of many kindreds, tongues and nations, passing through the city, plundering the Jews, will see their dead bodies lying in the street. But after three days and a half, on a sudden, the spirit of life from God will enter them they will arise and stand upon their feet, and great fear will fall upon them that see them. And then they shall hear a voice from heaven saying, ‘Come up hither,’ and they will ascend up to heaven in a cloud, with enemies beholding them.” (Voice of Warning, pag. 33.)

    Elder Bruce R. McConkie identified the two prophets as “followers of that humble man Joseph Smith, through whom the Lord of Heaven restored the fulness of his everlasting gospel in this final dispensation of grace. No doubt they will be members of the Council of the Twelve or of the First Presidency of the Church.” (Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, 3:509.)

    The two witnesses are raised up “to the Jewish nation” and are not necessarily desde the Jewish nation (see D&C 77:15–16 italics added.)


    18 Answers 18

    It means that you have defined a section in your master Layout.cshtml, but you have not included anything for that section in your View.

    If your _Layout.cshtml has something like this:

    Then all Views that use that Layout must include a @section with the same name (even if the contents of the section are empty):

    As an alternative, you can set required to false, then you won't be required to add the section in every View,

    or also you can wrap the @RenderSection in an if block,

    /bundles/jqueryval") > So i deleted those for the time being and everything is working for now. &ndash Kevin Dark Jun 11 '12 at 4:08

    I had a case with 3 levels a'la _MainLayout.cshtml <--- _Middle.cshtml <--- Page.cshtml. Even though doing like this:

    _MainLayout.cshtml

    _Middle.cshtml

    and in Page.cshtml defining

    I would still get the error

    The following sections have been defined but have not been rendered for the layout page “

    Turned out, the error was for the Middle.cshtml to rely on /Views/_ViewStart.cshtml to resolve it's parent layout. The problem was resolved by defining this in Middle.cshtml explicitly:

    Can't decide whether this would be by-design or a bug in MVC 4 - anyhow, problem was solved :)

    Also, you can add the following line to the _Layout.cshtml or _Layout.Mobile.cshtml :

    I'm not sure why the accepted answer was accepted if the suggested solution did not and does not solve the issue. There can actually be two related issues related to this topic.

    The master page (e.g. _Layout.cshtml ) has a section defined and it is required but the inheriting views did not implement it. Por ejemplo,

    The Layout Template

    The Inheriting View

    No need to show any code, just consider that there is no implementation of @section OptionBox <> on the view.

    The Error for Issue #1

    Section not defined: "OptionBox ".

    The master page (e.g. _Layout.cshtml ) has a section defined and it is required AND the inheriting view hizo implement it. However, the implementing view have additional script sections that are not defined on (any of) its master page(s).

    The Layout Template

    The Inheriting View

    The Error for Issue #2

    The following sections have been defined but have not been rendered for the layout page "

    The OP's issue is similar to Issue #2 and the accepted answer is for Issue #1.

    I think our solution was sufficiently different from everyone elses so I'll document it here.

    We have setup of Main layout, an intermediary layout and then the final action page render. Main.cshtml <- Config.cshtml <- Action.cshtml

    Only when web.config had customErrors='On/RemoteOnly' we got a custom error and no exception nor Application_Error was called. I could catch this on Layout = null line in the Error.cshtml. Exception was as in the question, missing scripts section.

    We did have it defined in Main.cshtml (with required:false) and Action.cshtml didn't have anything that wrote into the scripts section.

    Solution was to add @section scripts < @RenderSection("scripts", false) >to Config.cshtml.

    It appears that there is a mismatch between the View files that some versions of Visual Studio auto-generates for you when you use it to create a new Model. I encountered this problem using the new VS 2013 Community Edition and walking through the W3Schools tutorial at http://www.w3schools.com/aspnet/mvc_app.asp but the comments above indicate that its not a problem with the tutorial directions or with a single version of VS.

    It is true that you can make the error message go away by just removing the

    line from the create/edit layouts that were autogenerated by Visual Studio.

    But that solution does not address the root cause or leave you in a good place to do more than finish walking through the tutorial. At some point (probably fairly early) in the development of a real application, you are going to want access to the jquery validation code that the commenting-out solution removes from your app.

    If you use VS to create a new model for you, it also creates a set of five View files: Create, Delete, Details, Edit, and Index. Two of these views, Create and Edit are intended to let the user add/edit data for the fields in database records that underlie the model. For those views in a real app, you will probably want to do some amount of data validation using the jquery validation library before you save the record in the db. That is why VS adds the following lines

    to the bottom of those two views and not others. The autogenerated code is trying to make the validation library available for those views, but not the others.

    The error happens because VS either doesn't add a corresponding line to the shared _Layout.cshtml file or, see one answer above, adds it but leaves it commented out. This line is

    @RenderSection("scripts", required: false)

    If some of your views have a scripts section (as Create and Edit do), there has to be a RenderSection command embedded in the layout. If some scripts have the section and some do not (as Delete, Details, and Index do not), the RenderSection command has to have the required: false parameter.


    A section allows you to add something in a view which will be added in the layout. ie:-

    now this named section scripts will be rendered where you have specified in the layout.

    @RenderSection also has 2 signatures:-

    When you define an @section somewhere, lets say the _Layout.cshmtl file, it allows all of your Views to dynamically insert script files or CSS files or what ever into places in the defining page.

    This is very nice when, for example, you are using the jQuery UI Datepicker control only on a couple views in your site. So you may not want to globally include the jQuery UI Datepicker script file in your _Layout.cshtml since you are only going to need it on 2 or 3 pages.

    @section allows you to include those files only for certain views. It is needed since, a view cannot easily change the contents of the _Layout.cshtml otherwise.

    You can also position the @section at the bottom of the layout, for JavaScript files for example, or at the top of the layout, for CSS files. You could also use it to include a sidebar, made in HTML, only in certain views.

    Just be aware that Partial Views are not able to use the @section element by default.

    There is also one thing that should be added to the answers above that makes the use of "scripts" section crucial in most cases which is also the only reason for me to use this section.

    That is, it guarantees that scripts will load after all page contents which is essential. By doing this, you actually make sure necessary elements for your JavaScript code have loaded already and also it is a matter of performance.

    To elaborate how it works, I should mention that:

    1. That is a common practice to put the commonly used scripts inside the "_Layout" page to make them accessible among all pages and also prevent their repetition.
    2. All contents of child views are loaded into the _Layout view where @RenderBody() method is called. Except the contents inside @sections of each view.

    When we define "scripts" section inside the footer of the layout for common scripts and then add our scripts of child views inside the "scripts" section of each child view we make sure that these scripts will load after the script of the layout that makes the functions in the _Layout available to the scripts of the child views.

    Otherwise, the scripts of child views would be loaded where RenderBody() method is called, before the common scripts of the _Layout page.

    Inside _Layout:

    Inside MyView:

    I'd just like to add another form of answer here, because it took me a combo of reading all three current answers and some experimenting before I understood it.

    I copied some ajax code for a modal popup that was enclosed in @section scripts < >and put it in a view. It worked fine, but I took away the section bit, because it was encapsulated in <script> html - which is normally fine

    How I normally include a one-off script on a view:

    By doing this, the script is rendered inside the html of the view itself and the popup stopped working. This is because the script accesses elements outside of that view - it needs site-wide access so to be able to stop using @section scripts I would have to be put in the layout file.

    But I only really want this script rendered when this view is being used. I don't want to put it in the _layout file and have it loading on every single page.

    Lucky me! At the bottom of a default _layout file there's a line (I normally remove, to be honest):

    So by enclosing my <script> s in @section scripts < >on any view, it becomes part of the _layout , and is loaded after all other content (it's right at the bottom of the layout page), but only when that particular view is used.

    It basically allows a dynamic layout page which is very clever, I wonder if it's possible to do with stylesheets too.


    Unit 7 Section 1 : Multiples

    A multiple of a number is what you get when you multiply that number by some other whole number.

    p.ej. Multiplying 3 by 5 gives 15 so 15 is a multiple of 3

    Below is a sequence of numbers. The numbers are the first few multiples of the number 3.

    Note that 3 is also a multiple of itself.

    Example Question

    Below is a number square where the multiples of a particular number have been shaded.
    Practice Questions
    Work out the answer to each of these questions then click on the button marked to see whether you are correct. You can use the number square to help you for some of the questions.

    (a) What number are all the shaded numbers a multiple of?

    (b) What is the fifth multiple of this number?

    (d) What is the 12th multiple of this number?

    (c) What position is 36 in the multiples of this number?

    (e) What position is 96 in the multiples of this number?

    (f) What is the 100th multiple of this number?

    Ejercicios

    IMPORTANT: When a question asks for a list of numbers, you must separate them by commas, like this:

    Question 1
    The multiples of 11 have been shaded in on this number square.

    Pregunta 2
    Answer these questions about the multiples of 6 and 8.

    Pregunta 3
    Answer these questions about multiples of 12.

    Pregunta 4
    Look at the number square below and answer the questions.

    Pregunta 5
    The number 24 is a multiple of 2 and a multiple of 3.

    Pregunta 6
    Two multiples of a particular number have been shaded on the number square below.

    Pregunta 7
    65 and 91 are two multiples of a particular number. The number is not 1.

    Pregunta 8
    Three multiples of a number are 34, 170 and 255. What is the number?

    Pregunta 9
    Three multiples of a number are 38, 95 and 133. What is the number?

    Pregunta 10
    Four multiples of a number are 49, 77, 133 and 203. What is the number?


    II RULES ABOUT STARTING AND RESPONDING TO PROCEEDINGS

    Omitted

    Statement of reconciliation

    (1) Where the applicant is legally represented, the legal representative must, unless the court directs otherwise, complete and file with the application a statement in the form for this purpose referred to in Practice Direction 5A, certifying whether the legal representative has discussed with the applicant the possibility of a reconciliation and given the applicant the names and addresses of persons qualified to help effect a reconciliation.

    (2) This rule applies to an application for &ndash

    (a) a decree of divorce made under section 1 of the 1973 Act

    (b) a decree of judicial separation made under section 17 of the 1973 Act

    (c) a dissolution order as mentioned in section 37(1)(a) of the 2004 Act or

    (d) a separation order as mentioned in section 37(1)(d) of the 2004 Act.

    Limitation on applications in respect of same marriage or civil partnership

    (1) Subject to paragraph (2), a person may not make more than one application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order in respect of the same marriage or civil partnership unless &ndash

    (a) the first application has been dismissed or finally determined or

    (b) the court gives permission.

    (a) has, within one year of the date of the marriage or civil partnership, made an application for, as the case may be, a decree of judicial separation or an order for separation and

    (b) then, after that one-year period has passed, wishes to apply for a decree of divorce or a dissolution order on the same facts as those mentioned in the first application,

    that person does not need the court's permission to make the application referred to in sub-paragraph (b).

    Service of application

    (1) After an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order has been issued by the court, a copy of it must be served on the respondent and on any co-respondent.

    (Rule 6.5 provides for who may serve an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order.)

    (2) When the application is served on a respondent or co-respondent it must be accompanied by &ndash

    (a) a form for acknowledging service and

    (b) a notice of proceedings.

    Withdrawal of application before service

    An application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order may be withdrawn at any time before it has been served by giving notice in writing to the court where the proceedings were started.

    Who the parties are

    (1) The parties to matrimonial proceedings or civil partnership proceedings are &ndash

    (a) the parties to the marriage or civil partnership concerned and

    (b) any other person who is to be a party in accordance with a provision of the rules in this Part.

    (2) Subject to paragraph (3), where an application for a matrimonial order or an answer to such an application alleges that the other party to the marriage has committed adultery with a named person, that named person is to be the co-respondent.

    (3) The named person referred to in paragraph (2) is not to be a co-respondent where &ndash

    (b) that person has died or

    (c) unless the court directs otherwise &ndash

    (i) that person is under 16 years of age or

    (ii) the other party to the marriage is alleged in the application or answer to have committed rape on the named person.

    (4) Where an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order or an answer alleges that the other party to the marriage or civil partnership has had an improper association with a named person, the court may direct that the named person is to be the co-respondent to the application, unless the named person has died.

    (5) An application for directions under paragraph (3)(a) or (c) may be made without notice if the acknowledgment of service indicates that no party intends to defend the case.

    Nullity: Interim and full gender recognition certificates

    (1) Where the application is for&ndash

    (a) nullity of marriage under section 12(1)(g) of, or paragraph 11(1)(e) of Schedule 1 to, the 1973 Act 1

    (aa) nullity of marriage under section 12A(3) of the 1973 Act in a case where section 12(1)(g) of the 1973 Act applies or

    (b) an order of nullity of civil partnership under section 50(1)(d) of the 2004 Act,

    the court officer must send to the Secretary of State a notice in writing that the application has been made.

    (2) Where a copy of an interim gender recognition certificate has been filed with the application, that certificate must be attached to the notice.

    (3) Where no copy of an interim gender recognition certificate has been filed the notice must also state &ndash

    (a) in matrimonial proceedings&ndash

    (i) the names of the parties to the marriage and the date and place of the marriage, and

    (ii) the last address at which the parties to the marriage lived together as a married couple

    (b) in civil partnership proceedings &ndash

    (i) the names of the parties to the civil partnership and the date on, and the place at which, the civil partnership was formed, and

    (ii) the last address at which the parties to the civil partnership lived together as civil partners of each other and

    (c) in either case, such further particulars as the court officer considers appropriate.

    (i) a decree of nullity of marriage under section 12(1)(h) of the 1973 Act

    (ii) a decree of nullity of marriage under section 12A(3) of the 1973 Act in a case where section 12(1)(h) of the 1973 Act applies or

    (iii) an order of nullity of civil partnership under section 50(1)(e) of the 2004 Act and

    (b) a full gender recognition certificate has been issued to the respondent,

    the applicant must file a copy of that full certificate with the application unless the court, on an application made without notice, directs otherwise.

    (In relation to paragraphs (1)(aa), (3)(a) and (4)(a)(ii), section 9(6) of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 5 provides that where a civil partnership is converted into a marriage, the civil partnership ends on the conversion, and the resulting marriage is to be treated as having subsisted since the date the civil partnership was formed.)

    What the respondent and co-respondent should do on receiving the application

    (1) The respondent, and any co-respondent, must file an acknowledgment of service within 7 days beginning with the date on which the application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order was served.

    (2) This rule is subject to rule 6.42 (which specifies how the period for filing an acknowledgment of service is calculated where the application is served out of the jurisdiction).

    (3) The acknowledgment of service must&ndash

    (a) subject to paragraph (4), be signed by the respondent or the respondent's legal representative or, as the case may be, the co respondent or the co respondent's legal representative

    (b) include the respondent's or, as the case may be, the co respondent's address for service and

    (c) where it is filed by the respondent, indicate whether or not the respondent intends to defend the case.

    (4) Where paragraph (5) or (6) applies, the respondent must sign the acknowledgment of service personally.

    (5) This paragraph applies where&ndash

    (a) the application for a matrimonial order alleges that the respondent has committed adultery and

    (b) the respondent admits the adultery.

    (6) This paragraph applies where&ndash

    (a) the application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order alleges that the parties to the marriage or civil partnership concerned have been separated for more than 2 years and

    (b) the respondent consents to the making of the matrimonial or civil partnership order.

    (8) A respondent who wishes to defend the case must file and serve an answer within 21 days beginning with the date by which the acknowledgment of service is required to be filed.

    (9) An answer is not required where the respondent does not object to the making of the matrimonial or civil partnership order but objects to paying the costs of the application.

    (10) A respondent may file an answer even if the intention to do so was not indicated in the acknowledgment of service.

    (11) Paragraph (11A) applies where&mdash

    (i) nullity of marriage under section 12(1)(d) of the 1973 Act

    (ii) nullity of marriage under section 12A(3) of the 1973 Act in a case where section 12(1)(d) of the 1973 Act applies or

    (iii) nullity of civil partnership under section 50(1)(b) of the 2004 Act and

    (b) the respondent files an answer containing no more than a simple denial of the facts stated in the application.

    (11A) The respondent must, if intending to rebut the matters stated in the application, give notice to the court of that intention when filing the answer.

    (12) A respondent to an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order alleging 2 years' separation and the respondent's consent may &ndash

    (a) indicate consent to the making of the matrimonial or civil partnership order in writing at any time after service of the application, whether in the acknowledgment of service or otherwise

    (b) indicate lack of consent to the making of that order, or withdraw any such consent already given, by giving notice to the court.

    (13) Where a respondent gives a notice under paragraph (12)(b) and no other relevant fact is alleged, the proceedings must be stayed (GL) , and notice of the stay (GL) given to the parties by the court officer.

    (14) In this rule, a &lsquorelevant fact&rsquo is &ndash

    (a) in matrimonial proceedings, one of the facts mentioned in section (1)(2) of the 1973 Act and

    (b) in civil partnership proceedings, one of the facts mentioned in section 44(5) of the 2004 Act.

    (15) In paragraphs (3)(c), (8), (9) and (10), any reference to a respondent is to be read as including a reference to a co-respondent where the context so requires.

    (The form of the answer is referred to in Practice Direction 5A.)

    (In relation to paragraph (11)(a)(ii), section 9(6) of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 provides that where a civil partnership is converted into a marriage, the civil partnership ends on the conversion, and the resulting marriage is to be treated as having subsisted since the date the civil partnership was formed.)

    Supplemental application and amendment of application and answer

    (a) paragraphs (2)(a) and (b) and (3) set out when a supplemental application may or may not be made or an application may or may not be amended before an answer has been filed and before an application has been made under rule 7.19(1)

    (b) paragraphs (2)(c) and (3) set out when an answer may or may not be amended before an application has been made under rule 7.19(1)

    (c) paragraph (5) sets out when a supplemental application may be made or an application may be amended after an answer has been filed or after an application has been made under rule 7.19(1) and

    (d) paragraph (6) sets out when an answer may be amended after an application has been made under rule 7.19(1).

    (2) Unless paragraph (3) applies&mdash

    (a) a party making an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order may amend the application at any time before an answer to it has been filed

    (b) a party making an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order may make a supplemental application at any time before an answer has been filed

    (c) a party who has filed an answer may amend the answer.

    (3) No supplemental application may be made and no amendment to an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order or to an answer may be made under paragraph (2) if an application under rule 7.19(1) has been made in relation to the marriage or civil partnership concerned.

    (4) Where an amendment is made or a supplemental application is made under paragraph (2)&mdash

    (a) if the document amended is the application or if a supplemental application is made&mdash

    (i) it must be served in accordance with rule 7.8 and

    (c) any person who becomes a co-respondent to the proceedings in accordance with rule 7.10 as a consequence of such an amendment or supplemental application must be served with the documents required to be served on a co-respondent with an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order.

    (5) Where an answer has been filed, or an application has been made under rule 7.19(1), an amendment may not be made to an application and a supplemental application may not be made except&mdash

    (a) with the written consent of all the other parties or

    (b) with the permission of the court.

    (6) Where an answer has been filed and an application has been made under rule 7.19(1), an amendment may not be made to the answer except&mdash

    (a) with the written consent of all the other parties or

    (b) with the permission of the court.

    (7) Where paragraph (5) or (6) applies, the court may give directions as to&mdash

    (a) the service of the amended application, the amended answer or the supplemental application, as the case may be, and the service of any accompanying documents

    (b) the joining of any additional parties in accordance with rule 7.10 and

    (c) the extent to which rule 7.12 must be complied with in respect of any amended application or any supplemental application.

    (8) The court may direct that any person cease to be a party if, in consequence of any amendment made or supplemental application made under this rule, that person&mdash

    (a) no longer falls within rule 7.10(2) or (4) or

    (b) falls within rule 7.10(4), but it is no longer desirable for that person to be a party to the proceedings.

    (Practice Direction 7A contains information regarding amending applications, making supplemental applications and making second (or further) applications.)

    How the respondent can make an application

    (1) A respondent who wishes to make an application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order must make the application for that order within 21 days beginning with the date by which the respondent's acknowledgment of service is required to be filed, unless the court gives permission to make the application after that time has passed.

    (2) Where the respondent makes an application under this rule, that application is to be treated as an application in the same proceedings for the purposes of this Part.

    Further information about the contents of the application and the answer

    (1) The court may at any time order a party &ndash

    (a) to clarify any matter which is in dispute in the proceedings or

    (b) to give additional information in relation to any such matter,

    whether or not the matter is contained or referred to in the application for a matrimonial or civil partnership order or in the answer.

    (2) Paragraph (1) is subject to any rule of law to the contrary.

    (3) Where the court makes an order under paragraph (1), the party against whom it is made must &ndash

    (a) file the reply to the order made under paragraph (1) and

    (b) serve a copy of it on each of the other parties,

    within the time specified by the court.

    (4) The court may direct that information provided by a party to another party (whether given voluntarily or following an order made under paragraph (1)) must not be used for any purpose except for the proceedings in which it is given.


    Glossary Terms

    A cross section is the new face you see when you slice through a three-dimensional figure.

    For example, if you slice a rectangular pyramid parallel to the base, you get a smaller rectangle as the cross section.


    Ver el vídeo: Lesson (Agosto 2022).